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Dr. Fahim Al-Marhubi

Title:Associate Professor
Room #:1030
Email:cce3577@squ.edu.om
Ext. #:2906

Fields of Interest:

Economic growth, Governance and Institutions , Development, Economics of Common Currencies

Education:

Ph.D. in Economics from the Claremont Graduate University (U.S.A, 1988, 1994)
Dr. Fahim Al-Marhubi He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and Finance at Sultan Qaboos University. Dr. Al-Marhubi has served in various capacities including Dean, Assistant Dean of Research and Postgraduate Studies and Chair of the Department. He received his BA in Economics from the American University in Cairo (Egypt, 1985), and MA and Ph.D. in Economics from the Claremont Graduate University (U.S.A, 1988, 1994). His teaching interests are in the areas of macroeconomics, development economics and international money and finance. He has published in a number of internationally refereed journals including Public Choice, World Economy, Economic Letters, Contemporary Economic Policy, and Oxford Development Studies. He is a Research Fellow for the Economic Research Forum. In addition to producing a number of technical reports for various government and non-government agencies and institutions, Dr. Al-Marhubi has served as chair and representative of the Sultanate of Oman to the Indian Ocean Rim Academic Group of the Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation.

Selected Publications:

  • “Currency Policies for Inflation Control in the Formerly Centrally Planned Economies,” with Thomas D. Willett, in World Economy, Vol 17, No. 6 (November) 1994
  • “The Anti-Inflationary Influence of Corporatist Structures and Central Bank Independence: The Importance of the Hump Shaped Hypothesis,” with Thomas D. Willett, in Public Choice, Vol 84, 1995
  • “Corruption and Inflation,” Economic Letters , Vol. 66, February 2000
  • “Determinants of Governance: A Cross-Country Analysis”, Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol. 22, No. 3 (October), 2004
  • “Openness and Governance: Evidence Across Countries”, Oxford Development Studies, Vol. 33, No. 3 and 4 September/December 2005, 453-471.